The Sunken City, Los Angeles, is a fascinating site that attracts visitors from all over. Located at the eastern edge of Point Fermin Park, the area was once a neighborhood that slid into the ocean during a landslide in 1929 [1]. Today, the ruins of the sunken city are an urban Atlantis and a hidden cement cemetery for suburban seaside life [5].

The Sunken City

The area has become a tourist attraction, drawing locals and visitors who are fascinated by the ruins of the once-exclusive coastal bungalows. However, it is also a dangerous place and is closed to the public [7]. Despite this, some people still manage to visit the site and even climb over or under the iron fence erected in 1987 [8].

SUNKEN CITY Los Angeles

In the 1998 neo-noir comedy The Big Lebowski, the title character scatters a friend’s ashes into the ocean from Sunken City [3]. The area has also become a popular spot for teenage parties and photo shoots for high school metal bands from the 2000s [9].

Sunken city -Los Angeles

If you are interested in visiting Sunken City, it is important to note that the area is closed to the public due to safety concerns [7]. However, there are other nearby attractions that are worth visiting, such as Point Fermin Park, which is adjacent to Sunken City and is a beautifully lush green space that is home to the stately Point Fermin Lighthouse [1].

The Sunken City ❤️ | 🌎: San Pedro, Los Angeles | 📷: @_kmil   #CaliLove 🌴❤️

Just north of the park, you can find the Korean Friendship Bell, another one of San Pedro’s historic treasures [1].

We will also answer the most frequently asked questions before visiting.

FAQs

Why is Sunken City closed?

Sunken City is currently closed off to the public due to safety concerns [13]. Although it has become a popular tourist attraction, the area is still considered unstable and dangerous for visitors. It is fenced off with large no trespassing signs, and entering the area is considered trespassing, which can result in hefty fines [14].

How to get to Sunken City Los Angeles?

The entry point to Sunken City is located at 500 W. Paseo Del Mar in San Pedro, Los Angeles [7]. The area is currently closed off to visitors, but some people have reported ignoring the no trespassing signs and climbing under one of two fences to enter the area [10].

Can you visit Sunken City?

Sunken City is currently closed off to the public and entering the area is considered trespassing [13]. Although many visitors still come to see the area, it is fenced off with large no trespassing signs and considered dangerous for visitors. There have been reports of injuries and deaths recorded over the years at the Sunken City [14].

What is the Sunken City today?

Today, Sunken City remains closed off to visitors due to safety concerns [13]. It is considered dangerous and unstable for visitors to enter, with many reports of injuries and deaths over the years [14]. Despite this, it has become a popular tourist attraction and draws many locals and visitors who want to see the otherworldly scene that is now the Sunken City [15].

What age is the Sunken City for?

The Sunken City in San Pedro, California is the result of a slow-moving landslide that began in 1929 and continued over the next couple of decades [13]. Therefore, the age of the Sunken City can be considered to be around 90-100 years old, as of 2023.

Has Sunken City release date?

It is unclear what is meant by “Sunken City release date.” The Sunken City in San Pedro, California is a natural formation caused by a landslide and is not a product that can have a release date. However, the area is closed to the public due to safety concerns [12].