Forest Hills Cemetery is a unique and fascinating place to explore in Boston, Massachusetts.

Forest Hills Cemetery Gate

Established in 1848, it covers 275 acres in the Jamaica Plain neighborhood and is both a final resting place for generations of notable Bostonians and a peaceful environment for anyone to wander and enjoy various examples of late 19th-century art and architecture [5].

Fall Foliage 2015, Historic Forest Hills Cemetery, Novmeber 2, 2015

The cemetery was founded to provide a magnificent park-like setting to bury and remember family and friends.

In recognition of its unique qualities, Forest Hills Cemetery was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 2004 and was named one of the 1000 Greatest Places in Massachusetts [8].

Fall Foliage 2015, Historic Forest Hills Cemetery, Novmeber 2, 2015

The cemetery is not just a burial ground but also an arboretum, a garden, and an art center [1]. It boasts a unique collection of interactive grave markers, as well as sculptures paying tribute to individuals and causes from times past [7].

Fall Foliage 2015, Historic Forest Hills Cemetery, Novmeber 2, 2015

Walking through the cemetery, you can’t help but feel a sense of reverence for the people buried there, but also a whimsy and playfulness in the art and architecture around you [1].

The Gateway to Forest Hills Cemetery

The cemetery is centered around a peaceful lake and is filled with natural beauty. It is also an excellent place for birdwatching, with over 60 species of birds spotted in the area [4].

Fall Foliage 2015, Historic Forest Hills Cemetery, Novmeber 2, 2015

Additionally, Forest Hills Cemetery is an active burial ground, but it also plays the role of open-air museum, making it a popular spot for visitors from all over the world [7].

@frost_oath Haunting Forest Hills Cemetery in Jamaica Plain, MA #foryou#fy #cemetery #graveyard #victorian #taphophile #garden #grave #tomb #atlasobscura #gothtok ♬ Main Title Theme – Jill Tracy and The Malcontent Orchestra

FAQs

What is the history behind Forest Hills Cemetery in Boston?

Forest Hills Cemetery was established in 1848 as a municipal cemetery for the community of Roxbury, Massachusetts [12].

The cemetery was founded by Henry A.S. Dearborn, who was the mayor of Roxbury at the time [13]. He designed Forest Hills Cemetery as a tranquil and beautiful place for citizens to bury and remember their loved ones [13].

What is the significance of Forest Hills Cemetery’s interactive grave markers?

Forest Hills Cemetery is known for its interactive grave markers. These unique markers allow visitors to learn more about the people buried in the cemetery.

For example, the grave of a shoe manufacturer has a marker in the shape of a shoe, and the grave of a pilot has a marker in the shape of an airplane [11]. The cemetery also has a miniature village that visitors can explore [11].

Who was Henry A. S. Dearborn and how is he related to Forest Hills Cemetery?

Henry A.S. Dearborn was the mayor of Roxbury when Forest Hills Cemetery was founded in 1848. He designed the cemetery to be a tranquil and lovely place for citizens to bury and remember their friends and family [13].

Dearborn was also the first president of the Massachusetts Horticultural Society and oversaw the society’s efforts to create the Arnold Arboretum and Franklin Park, which are adjacent to Forest Hills Cemetery [17].

What is the architectural style of the bell tower in Forest Hills Cemetery and when was it completed?

Forest Hills Cemetery has a bell tower that was completed in 1893. The tower was designed in the Romanesque Revival architectural style by architect Willard T. Sears [16]. It is not clear whether the bell tower is still in use today.

How is Forest Hills Cemetery related to the Massachusetts Horticultural Society and its efforts?

Forest Hills Cemetery is related to the Massachusetts Horticultural Society and its efforts to create the Arnold Arboretum and Franklin Park. Henry A.S. Dearborn, the founder of Forest Hills Cemetery, was the first president of the Massachusetts Horticultural Society and oversaw the society’s efforts to create the Arnold Arboretum and Franklin Park [17].